Ovation, Dalmatian & Grecian Gems ex Venice to Athens

7 Night Cruise sailing from Venice to Athens onboard Seabourn Ovation.

Departure date: 28 October 2020
Embark port: Venice, Italy
Cruise line: Seabourn
Ship: Seabourn Ovation

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Category Quad Triple Twin Single

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Itinerary

Cruise Itinerary
Date Activity Arrive Depart
28/10/20 Venice, Italy 05:00 PM
29/10/20 Zadar, Croatia 08:00 AM 05:00 PM
30/10/20 Dubrovnik, Croatia 08:00 AM 09:00 PM
31/10/20 Durres, Albania. 08:00 AM 09:00 PM
01/11/20 Corfu, Greece 07:00 AM 05:00 PM
02/11/20 Katakolon, Greece 07:00 AM 03:00 PM
03/11/20 Nafplion, Greece 08:00 AM 05:00 PM
04/11/20 Athens (Piraeus) Greece 07:00 AM
Itinerary may vary by sailing date and itineraries may be changed at the cruise lines discretion. Please check itinerary details at time of booking and before booking other travel services such as airline tickets.

Cruise Description

7 Night Cruise sailing from Venice to Athens onboard Seabourn Ovation.

Seabourn Ovation, a sister-ship to the already prestigious Seabourn Encore. Seabourn Ovation represents another welcome stage in the evolution of small-ship cruising, which Seabourn pioneered and has consistently expanded and enriched. Both ships will deliver a wealth of new concepts, a fresh vision and a host of illuminating ideas to delight the world’s most discerning travelers.

Highlights of this cruise:

Venice, Italy
The first settlement of the marshy islands in the lagoon was for protection from barbarian tribes that terrorized mainland farms and villages. Island living quickly led to the development of skills in handling boats, then ships. Maritime trade conducted by shrewd merchants brought great wealth, which permitted the building of palaces, churches and monuments. The city became the center of the vast Venetian empire, its name forever summoning visions of grandeur, magnificence, richness, graciousness and beauty. Although later linked to the mainland, first by a railway bridge built in 1848 and then by a motor causeway in 1930, this island city will always be considered the "Queen of the Sea." There are no cars in Venice; all transportation is by boat or on foot along the time-worn, cobblestone streets and across some 400 bridges that span the city's 177 canals. Enchanting Venice truly offers an atmosphere that exists nowhere else.

Zadar, Croatia
Located in central Dalmatia Zadar is one of the Adriatic's most historically interesting towns with a wealth of sightseeing and exciting nightlife. Zadar was founded by the Romans, attacked by the Turks, ruled by the Austrians and made part of Italy until 1943 when the Germans moved in. Allied bombing destroyed much of the historic centre which was rebuilt after the war only to suffer more attacks by Yugoslav forces in 1991. In recent years Zadar has undergone a startling revival. Cafes and bars are filled, museums and churches have been restored and tourists pour in to take boats to nearby islands.

Dubrovnik, Croatia
Founded in the 7th century, Dubrovnik rose to greatness as a merchant state, independent republic and cultural crossroads. The traffic-free Old Town has been called a Croatian Athens. This UNESCO designated World Heritage Site is a living museum of the ages with fortifications, chapels, monastic cloisters and Europe's second-oldest synagogue crowded into its ancient walls. Relax at a sidewalk café, listen to the chimes of the 14th-century bell tower or join the promenade down the palace-lined avenue known as the Stradun.

Durres, Albania
Durres is a very ancient city, but today its antiquities are only visible intermittently. Originally a Greek colony, it has endured Roman and Byzantine rule and more recently a long, dark chapter under a severe Communist dictatorship. It is a busy port, located at the narrowest passage of the Adriatic Sea just across from Bari, Italy. Notable sites in Durres itself include a large, but only partially unearthed Roman amphitheater, built in the 2nd Century AD by the Emperor Trajan. It is a candidate for UNESCO World Heritage inscription, surrounded and in a few cases actually occupied by modern housing. Nearby, a colonnade of a 5th Century Byzantine marketplace is another surviving relic. From Durres, you can also visit the Albania’s capital, Tirana, a vibrant modern city flexing its muscles after its long enforced isolation. The large National History Museum has an extensive and fascinating collection, including a pavilion containing numerous Eastern Orthodox icons by the master of color Onufri, and another dedicated to the late Albanian nun Mother Teresa. East of Tirana, an Austrian-built cable car can carry visitors up the slopes to panoramic views at the Mt. Dajti National Park.

Kerkira, Nisos Kerkira (Corfu), Greece
A scant few miles off the Albanian coast lies the island of Corfu, one of the most richly endowed of all the Greek Isles. Praised by Homer in "The Odyssey" and selected by Shakespeare as the setting for "The Tempest," the island retains evidence of cultural heritage from each of its past rulers - Byzantium, Venice, France, Russia and Great Britain. Rolling acres of olive groves, small orchards of lemon and orange trees, tall cypress, oleander, and myrtle bushes lend a lush, verdant look to the island. While the oldest part of Corfu Town has cobblestone lanes so narrow only pedestrian travel is possible, the modern sector has wide avenues. Residents boast that its "Spianada" is the largest and most beautiful square in all Greece.

Katakolon (Olympia), Greece
The small commercial port of Katakolon serves the inland town of Pyrgos as chief export center for grapes, raisins, regional fruits and vegetables that grow in the fertile hinterland. Fifteen miles in the distance lies Olympia, the sacred ancient site where the Olympic Games had their beginnings.

Nafplion, Greece
Held to be one of the loveliest small towns in all the islands, Navplion has a tradition and culture all its own. The sheltered location, below a rocky headland crowned by a Venetian fortress is perhaps unrivaled in Greece. After the Greek revolution of the early 19th century, Navplion served as the first modern capital. The neoclassical houses, large official buildings and carefully planned seafront streets all date from this period.

Piraeus (Athens), Greece
Piraeus has been the port for Athens since 482 BC. The busy harbor is filled with ferries and cruise ships making their way to the Greek Islands and other Mediterranean cities. The busy metropolis of Athens and its treasure trove of antiquities lie just a few miles from the port. Even as the reality of the modern city took hold, with its high-rise apartments, crowded sidewalks and bustling traffic, the beauty of the Acropolis, the outstanding museums, charming cafés, sidewalk markets and startling views come together in a cultural mosaic for all to enjoy.

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